Overview
Switch to Expert-View
Copy Resource Link

Vienna-Oxford International Corpus of English (VOICE) XML
Type(s): acdh:TopCollection
fingerprint PID: create
device_hub Principal Investigator(s): Marie-Luise Pitzl-Hagin , Barbara Seidlhofer
person_add Contact(s): Marie-Luise Pitzl-Hagin
today Created Start Date: 1 Jun 2005 , 1 Apr 2020
today Created End Date: 31 Jan 2013 , 30 Sep 2021
today Available Date: 15 Mar 2022
attachment Number of Items: 806
attachment Binary Size: 0.3 GB
Vienna-Oxford International Corpus of English (VOICE) XML
Property Value(s)
acdh:aclRead
dstoxreiter
acdh:aclWrite
dstoxreiter
acdh:createdBy
dstoxreiter
acdh:hasAccessRestrictionSummary
public 772
restricted 3
acdh:hasAppliedMethod
VOICE, the Vienna-Oxford International Corpus of English, is a one-million-word corpus of naturally-occurring, non-scripted, face-to-face interactions carried out using English as a lingua franca (ELF), i.e. English used as a common means of communication among speakers from different first-language backgrounds. The interactions recorded and transcribed are complete speech events from different domains (educational, leisure, professional) and represent different speech event types (conversation, interview, meeting, panel, press conference, question-answer session, seminar discussion, service encounter, working group discussion, workshop discussion).
acdh:hasAppliedMethodDescription
VOICE is based on audio-recordings carried out between July 2001 and November 2007, usually using portable mini-disc recorders with external microphones. These audio-recordings capture 151 naturally-occurring, non-scripted, face-to-face interactions involving 753 identified individuals from 49 different first language backgrounds using English as a lingua franca (ELF), i.e. English used as a common means of communication among speakers from different first-language backgrounds. Most of the audio-recordings are supplemented by detailed field notes including information about the nature of the speech event and the interaction taking place as well as about the participants engaging in these ELF interactions. The audio-recordings were transcribed, checked and proof-read by trained transcribers and researchers in accordance with the VOICE mark-up and spelling conventions. See sub-collection Documentation for more information on mark-up and spelling conventions. Details for each electronic text are given in the individual text headers. The principles and practices underlying the selection and design of the corpus are documented in the project and sampling description of the Corpus Header.
acdh:hasArrangement
The Vienna-Oxford International Corpus of English (VOICE) is stored in a TEI-based XML format. Each sub-collection in ARCHE is one version of VOICE from 1.0, 1.1, 2.0, 2.0 POS to 3.0. These collections were divided in further sub-collections which represent the five domains represented in VOICE (ED: educational, LE: leisure, PB: professional buisness, PO: professional organizational, PR: professional research and science). Domains in VOICE denote socially defined situations or areas of activity. The domain collections contain resources (i.e. the individual corpus texts, which are transcripts of the speech events) in a TEI-based XML format. In addition to versions of VOICE, the Top Collection VOICE in ARCHE also contains the sub-collection Documentation.
acdh:hasAvailableDate
2022-03-15
acdh:hasBinarySize
0.3 GB
acdh:hasContact
acdh:hasCreatedEndDate
2013-01-31 , 2021-09-30
acdh:hasCreatedStartDate
2005-06-01 , 2020-04-01
acdh:hasCreator
acdh:hasCurator
acdh:hasCustomCitation
year = {2021},
date = {2021-09-30T00:00:00.000000},
author = {Seidlhofer, Barbara and Pitzl, Marie-Luise and Schopper, Daniel and Breiteneder, Angelika and Breuer, Hans-Christian and Dorn, Nora and Klimpfinger, Theresa and Majewski, Stefan and Osimk-Teasdale, Ruth and Pirker, Hannes and Radeka, Michael and Riegler, Stefanie and Siam, Omar and Stoxreiter, Daniel},
acdh:hasDepositor
acdh:hasDescription
The most wide-spread contemporary use of English throughout the world is that of English as a lingua franca (ELF), i.e. English used as a common means of communication among speakers from different first-language backgrounds (Seidlhofer 2011). Nevertheless, linguistic descriptions before the mid-2000s focused almost entirely on English as spoken and written by its native speakers. Starting in 2005, the VOICE project sought to redress the balance by compiling the first general corpus capturing spoken ELF interactions as they happen naturally in various contexts. VOICE was designed and compiled to make possible linguistic descriptions of this most common contemporary use of English by providing a corpus of spoken ELF interactions which has been freely accessible to linguistic researchers all over the world since 2009. The Vienna-Oxford International Corpus of English (VOICE) was initially created by Barbara Seidlhofer (founding director) and Angelika Breiteneder, Theresa Klimpfinger, Stefan Majewski, Marie-Luise Pitzl (project researchers) from 2005 to 2011 at the English Department at the University of Vienna. VOICE 1.0 Online was released in 2009, VOICE 1.0 XML in 2011. VOICE POS XML 2.0 was the first part-of-speech tagged version of VOICE and was based on the same data as VOICE 2.0 XML. Both VOICE 2.0 XML and VOICE 2.0 POS XML were released in 2013. Additional researchers centrally involved in the creation of VOICE 2.0 POS XML were Ruth Osimk-Teasdale, Michael Radeka and Nora Dorn. VOICE 2.0 XML and VOICE POS XML 2.0 included minor revisions with regard to previous versions. VOICE 3.0 XML and VOICE 3.0 Online are based on the same data as VOICE 1.0/2.0 and were created from spring 2020 to autumn 2021 in the VOICE CLARIAH project. VOICE 3.0 XML is a new, merged TEI-conform XML version of VOICE 2.0 XML and VOICE POS XML 2.0, which contains spoken mark-up as well as part-of-speech and lemma information in TEI-XML format. The members of the VOICE CLARIAH team who created VOICE 3.0 were: Marie-Luise Pitzl (PI), Daniel Schopper, Barbara Seidlhofer, Hans Christian Breuer, Ruth Osmik-Teasdale, Hannes Pirker, Stefanie Riegler, Omar Siam.
acdh:hasHosting
acdh:hasLanguage
acdh:hasLicenseSummary
Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Austria (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 AT) 638
Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) 164
In Copyright - Educational Use Permitted 3
acdh:hasLicensor
acdh:hasMetadataCreator
acdh:hasNumberOfItems
806
acdh:hasOwner
acdh:hasPid
acdh:hasPrincipalInvestigator
acdh:hasRelatedDiscipline
acdh:hasRightsHolder
acdh:hasSubject
conversation , educational , English as a lingua franca , interaction , interculturality , interview , leisure , meeting , multilingualism , panel , press conference , professional business , professional organizational , professional research and science , question-answer session , seminar discussion , service encounter , working group discussion , workshop discussion
acdh:hasTitle
Vienna-Oxford International Corpus of English (VOICE) XML
acdh:hasUpdatedDate
2022-03-15T09:20:42.703775
acdh:hasUpdatedRole
dstoxreiter
acdh:hasUrl
rdf:type
acdh:hasIdentifier

Inverse Data

Property Value(s)

Summary

info_outline Subject(s): conversation , educational , English as a lingua franca , interaction , interculturality , interview , leisure , meeting , multilingualism , panel , press conference , professional business , professional organizational , professional research and science , question-answer session , seminar discussion , service encounter , working group discussion , workshop discussion
info_outline Description: The most wide-spread contemporary use of English throughout the world is that of English as a lingua franca (ELF), i.e. English used as a common means of communication among speakers from different first-language backgrounds (Seidlhofer 2011). Nevertheless, linguistic descriptions before the mid-2000s focused almost entirely on English as spoken and written by its native speakers. Starting in 2005, the VOICE project sought to redress the balance by compiling the first general corpus capturing spoken ELF interactions as they happen naturally in various contexts. VOICE was designed and compiled to make possible linguistic descriptions of this most common contemporary use of English by providing a corpus of spoken ELF interactions which has been freely accessible to linguistic researchers all over the world since 2009. The Vienna-Oxford International Corpus of English (VOICE) was initially created by Barbara Seidlhofer (founding director) and Angelika Breiteneder, Theresa Klimpfinger, Stefan Majewski, Marie-Luise Pitzl (project researchers) from 2005 to 2011 at the English Department at the University of Vienna. VOICE 1.0 Online was released in 2009, VOICE 1.0 XML in 2011. VOICE POS XML 2.0 was the first part-of-speech tagged version of VOICE and was based on the same data as VOICE 2.0 XML. Both VOICE 2.0 XML and VOICE 2.0 POS XML were released in 2013. Additional researchers centrally involved in the creation of VOICE 2.0 POS XML were Ruth Osimk-Teasdale, Michael Radeka and Nora Dorn. VOICE 2.0 XML and VOICE POS XML 2.0 included minor revisions with regard to previous versions. VOICE 3.0 XML and VOICE 3.0 Online are based on the same data as VOICE 1.0/2.0 and were created from spring 2020 to autumn 2021 in the VOICE CLARIAH project. VOICE 3.0 XML is a new, merged TEI-conform XML version of VOICE 2.0 XML and VOICE POS XML 2.0, which contains spoken mark-up as well as part-of-speech and lemma information in TEI-XML format. The members of the VOICE CLARIAH team who created VOICE 3.0 were: Marie-Luise Pitzl (PI), Daniel Schopper, Barbara Seidlhofer, Hans Christian Breuer, Ruth Osmik-Teasdale, Hannes Pirker, Stefanie Riegler, Omar Siam.

Cite Resource

Child Resource(s)

Switch to Tree-View
7 Result(s) Page 1 of 1 Items Sort by
Type: acdh:Collection
today Available Date: 15 Feb 2022
Show Summary Hide Summary
info The collection 'Documentation' contains the TEI/XML schema for Voice 3.0 and previous versions of VOICE and manuals explaining the search functions of the new VOICE 3.0 Online interface, the part-of-speech (POS) tagging in VOICE and the VOICE Transcription Conventions (mark-up and spelling conventions).
Type: acdh:Collection
today Available Date: 15 Feb 2022 Version: 1.0
Show Summary Hide Summary
info The most wide-spread contemporary use of English throughout the world is that of English as a lingua franca (ELF), i.e. English used as a common means of communication among speakers from different first-language backgrounds (Seidlhofer 2011). Nevertheless, linguistic descriptions before the mid-2000s focused almost entirely on English as spoken and written by its native speakers. Starting in 2005, the VOICE project sought to redress the balance by compiling the first general corpus capturing spoken ELF interactions as they happen naturally in various contexts. VOICE was designed and compiled to make possible linguistic descriptions of this most common contemporary use of English by providing a corpus of spoken ELF interactions which has been freely accessible to linguistic researchers all over the world since 2009. The Vienna-Oxford International Corpus of English (VOICE) was initially created by Barbara Seidlhofer (founding director) and Angelika Breiteneder, Theresa Klimpfinger, Stefan Majewski, Marie-Luise Pitzl (project researchers) from 2005 to 2011 at the English Department at the University of Vienna. VOICE 1.0 Online was released in 2009, VOICE 1.0 XML in 2011.
Type: acdh:Collection
today Available Date: 15 Feb 2022 Version: 1.1
Show Summary Hide Summary
info The most wide-spread contemporary use of English throughout the world is that of English as a lingua franca (ELF), i.e. English used as a common means of communication among speakers from different first-language backgrounds (Seidlhofer 2011). Nevertheless, linguistic descriptions before the mid-2000s focused almost entirely on English as spoken and written by its native speakers. Starting in 2005, the VOICE project sought to redress the balance by compiling the first general corpus capturing spoken ELF interactions as they happen naturally in various contexts. VOICE was designed and compiled to make possible linguistic descriptions of this most common contemporary use of English by providing a corpus of spoken ELF interactions which has been freely accessible to linguistic researchers all over the world since 2009. The Vienna-Oxford International Corpus of English (VOICE) was initially created by Barbara Seidlhofer (founding director) and Angelika Breiteneder, Theresa Klimpfinger, Stefan Majewski, Marie-Luise Pitzl (project researchers) from 2005 to 2011 at the English Department at the University of Vienna. Minor revisions and corrections for VOICE 1.1 were made by Ruth Osimk. VOICE 1.0 Online was released in 2009, VOICE 1.0 XML and VOICE 1.1 XML in 2011.
Type: acdh:Collection
today Available Date: 15 Feb 2022 Version: POS 2.0
Show Summary Hide Summary
info The most wide-spread contemporary use of English throughout the world is that of English as a lingua franca (ELF), i.e. English used as a common means of communication among speakers from different first-language backgrounds (Seidlhofer 2011). Nevertheless, linguistic descriptions before the mid-2000s focused almost entirely on English as spoken and written by its native speakers. Starting in 2005, the VOICE project sought to redress the balance by compiling the first general corpus capturing spoken ELF interactions as they happen naturally in various contexts. VOICE was designed and compiled to make possible linguistic descriptions of this most common contemporary use of English by providing a corpus of spoken ELF interactions which has been freely accessible to linguistic researchers all over the world since 2009. The Vienna-Oxford International Corpus of English (VOICE) was initially created by Barbara Seidlhofer (founding director) and Angelika Breiteneder, Theresa Klimpfinger, Stefan Majewski, Marie-Luise Pitzl (project researchers) from 2005 to 2011 at the English Department at the University of Vienna. VOICE 1.0 Online was released in 2009, VOICE 1.0 XML in 2011. VOICE POS XML 2.0 was the first part-of-speech tagged version of VOICE and was based on the same data as VOICE 2.0 XML. VOICE 2.0 XML and VOICE POS XML 2.0 included minor revisions with regard to previous versions and were released in 2013. Additional researchers centrally involved in the creation of VOICE 2.0 POS XML were Ruth Osimk-Teasdale, Michael Radeka and Nora Dorn.
Type: acdh:Collection
today Available Date: 15 Feb 2022 Version: 2.0
Show Summary Hide Summary
info The most wide-spread contemporary use of English throughout the world is that of English as a lingua franca (ELF), i.e. English used as a common means of communication among speakers from different first-language backgrounds (Seidlhofer 2011). Nevertheless, linguistic descriptions before the mid-2000s focused almost entirely on English as spoken and written by its native speakers. Starting in 2005, the VOICE project sought to redress the balance by compiling the first general corpus capturing spoken ELF interactions as they happen naturally in various contexts. VOICE was designed and compiled to make possible linguistic descriptions of this most common contemporary use of English by providing a corpus of spoken ELF interactions which has been freely accessible to linguistic researchers all over the world since 2009. The Vienna-Oxford International Corpus of English (VOICE) was initially created by Barbara Seidlhofer (founding director) and Angelika Breiteneder, Theresa Klimpfinger, Stefan Majewski, Marie-Luise Pitzl (project researchers) from 2005 to 2011 at the English Department at the University of Vienna. VOICE 1.0 Online was released in 2009, VOICE 1.0 XML in 2011. VOICE 2.0 XML includes minor revisions with regard to previous versions, but is otherwise based on the same data as VOICE 1.0 XML. These minor revisions were gathered by Ruth Osimk-Teasdale and Michael Radeka and corrections were made by Ruth Osimk-Teasdale. VOICE 2.0 XML was released in 2013.
Type: acdh:Collection
today Available Date: 15 Feb 2022 Version: 3.0
Show Summary Hide Summary
info The most wide-spread contemporary use of English throughout the world is that of English as a lingua franca (ELF), i.e. English used as a common means of communication among speakers from different first-language backgrounds (Seidlhofer 2011). Nevertheless, linguistic descriptions before the mid-2000s focused almost entirely on English as spoken and written by its native speakers. Starting in 2005, the VOICE project sought to redress the balance by compiling the first general corpus capturing spoken ELF interactions as they happen naturally in various contexts. VOICE was designed and compiled to make possible linguistic descriptions of this most common contemporary use of English by providing a corpus of spoken ELF interactions which has been freely accessible to linguistic researchers all over the world since 2009. The Vienna-Oxford International Corpus of English (VOICE) was initially created by Barbara Seidlhofer (founding director) and Angelika Breiteneder, Theresa Klimpfinger, Stefan Majewski, Marie-Luise Pitzl (project researchers) from 2005 to 2011 at the English Department at the University of Vienna. VOICE 1.0 Online was released in 2009, VOICE 1.0 XML in 2011. VOICE POS XML 2.0 was the first part-of-speech tagged version of VOICE and was based on the same data as VOICE 2.0 XML. Both VOICE 2.0 XML and VOICE 2.0 POS XML were released in 2013. Additional researchers centrally involved in the creation of VOICE 2.0 POS XML were Ruth Osimk-Teasdale, Michael Radeka and Nora Dorn. VOICE 2.0 XML and VOICE POS XML 2.0 included minor revisions with regard to previous versions. VOICE 3.0 XML and VOICE 3.0 Online are based on the same data as VOICE 1.0/2.0 and were created from spring 2020 to autumn 2021 in the VOICE CLARIAH project. VOICE 3.0 XML is a new, merged TEI-conform XML version of VOICE 2.0 XML and VOICE POS XML 2.0, which contains spoken mark-up as well as part-of-speech and lemma information in TEI-XML format. The members of the VOICE CLARIAH team who created VOICE 3.0 were: Marie-Luise Pitzl (PI), Daniel Schopper, Barbara Seidlhofer, Hans Christian Breuer, Ruth Osmik-Teasdale, Hannes Pirker, Stefanie Riegler, Omar Siam.
Type: acdh:Resource
today Available Date: 17 Feb 2022
7 Result(s) Page 1 of 1 Items Sort by